magictransistor:

Katsushika Hokusai (葛飾 北斎), One Thousand Pictures of the Ocean [Chie no Umi]; Gotô Kujira Tsuki (Whalling off the Goto Islands), c. 1834.

(via fishstickmonkey)

americanprintmaker:

finished another block for a multi-block linocut print.

rebeccataylorny:

Can’t decide which I love more, the undulating forms or the playful shadows. // Richard Deacon @tategallery  (at Tate Britain)

rebeccataylorny:

Can’t decide which I love more, the undulating forms or the playful shadows. // Richard Deacon @tategallery (at Tate Britain)

thekimonogallery:

wiki: Expo ‘70 was a World’s Fair held in Suita, OsakaJapan between March 15 and September 13, 1970. The theme of the Expo was “Progress and Harmony for Mankind.” In Japanese Expo ‘70 is often referred to as Ōsaka Banpaku. This was the first World’s Fair held in Japan.

(Source: pinktentacle.com)

mughalshit:

Black Buck and his Keeper
Manohar
India, Mughal, c. 1616
Opaque watercolors and gold on paper

The study of an Indian black buck being led by its keeper was painted by the Mughal court artist Manohar, who signed his work on the green ground at top and bottom of the painting. The posture of the keeper who bends one knee, crouching slightly, while looking over his shoulder, is conceivably inspired by the figure of Joseph in Albrecht Durer’s engraving The Flight to Egypt. Engravings by, or after, Durer reached the Mughal court in the late 16th and early 17th centuries, brought mainly by the Jesuits who came from Portuguese Goa, and in several cases were copied directly by the imperial artists. Little is known of Manohar, but contemporary ascriptions to manuscripts attest to his having entered royal service under the Mughal emperor Akbar (r. 1556-1605) and he became one of the most important artists of his son and successor, Jahangir (r. 1605-1627). Floral borders were added to his painting late in the reign of Jahangir or early in the reign of Shah Jahan, and the page was preserved in a royal album which became dismembered at some unknown date.

mughalshit:

Black Buck and his Keeper

Manohar

India, Mughal, c. 1616

Opaque watercolors and gold on paper

The study of an Indian black buck being led by its keeper was painted by the Mughal court artist Manohar, who signed his work on the green ground at top and bottom of the painting. The posture of the keeper who bends one knee, crouching slightly, while looking over his shoulder, is conceivably inspired by the figure of Joseph in Albrecht Durer’s engraving The Flight to Egypt. Engravings by, or after, Durer reached the Mughal court in the late 16th and early 17th centuries, brought mainly by the Jesuits who came from Portuguese Goa, and in several cases were copied directly by the imperial artists.
Little is known of Manohar, but contemporary ascriptions to manuscripts attest to his having entered royal service under the Mughal emperor Akbar (r. 1556-1605) and he became one of the most important artists of his son and successor, Jahangir (r. 1605-1627). Floral borders were added to his painting late in the reign of Jahangir or early in the reign of Shah Jahan, and the page was preserved in a royal album which became dismembered at some unknown date.

(Source: collections.vam.ac.uk)

thejapanesewoodblock:




Woman Making Rabbit Shadow for Small Boy


























Ryūryūkyo Shinsai (Japan, 1764 (?)-1820)

Japan, 1807
Prints; woodcuts
Surimono; color woodblock print

thejapanesewoodblock:

Woman Making Rabbit Shadow for Small Boy

Japan, 1807

Prints; woodcuts
Surimono; color woodblock print

drawpaintprint:

Tsukioka Yoshitoshi: The Battle of the Cats and Mice ( Byōso kassen ) 1859

(Source: stoopkidsmke)

kerensunna:

Louise Bourgeois and Tracey Emin: Do Not Abandon Me

(via howtonotsuckatart)

jibadojo:

Komachizakura no Sei and Otomo no Kuronushi

jibadojo:

Komachizakura no Sei and Otomo no Kuronushi

(via fishstickmonkey)